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SUMMER 2019 HOMEWARD BOUND (Part 7 of 7)

Just in came the news that the lock at Canso/ Port Hawkesbury is currently out of service due to a power cut as a result of hurricane Dorian. I am happy to say that I feel blessed to be faced with minor issues like fallen branches, trees, damaged motorcars and inoperable locks caused by power cuts. Spare a thought for the Bahamas that endured a sustained and relentless assault from Dorian that lasted more than 48 hours, extremely destructive. Lives are lost. Towns in ruins. No trees standing.

Late evening update has power restored to the area with the lock fully operational. Well done Nova Scotia Power. We are back to Plan “A”.

Cleared the lock on Tuesday morning 0900. This was lock number 32 for the summer, and our final one. Warm, sunny and still. What a gorgeous morning. Our pilot (yes, we need one for this stretch) is having fun and has taken the wheel himself, taking the ship down past Port Hawkesbury and to the head of Chedabucto Bay.

We disembark the pilot late in the forenoon in continuing calm conditions.

Now is the time to forge ahead and cover some distance. Another low-pressure system forming over Maine is forecast to bring strong SW winds to the Nova Scotia coast later the next day. SW’lies mean lumpy seas and headwinds.

Picton Castle raised Cross Island on the morning of Wednesday, 11 September. Seas are getting up, the SW wind is up to Force 5. In another few hours, this will be inhospitable and uncomfortable. A couple of hours later we pass The Ovens, out of the chop. Set up for coming alongside, prepare the semi dory for launching, slow down. Past Battery Point the last sail comes in, the boat is launched, standing by to assist docking if required.

And there is Lunenburg! Its unique waterfront with the bold and cheerful colours of its warehouses and weatherboard homes in stark contrast to the grey skies and dull water. Picton Castle’s dock ahead on the port bow.  Hug the red laterals, then a wide left turn to bring the wind fine on the port bow, ready to back into the berth. Let the wind do the job, take your time. As the ship backs down, light kicks ahead bring her head to wind, then through. Headline ashore so as not to lose the bow. Springs. Sternline. In position, head to the SSE. Finished with engines and the wheel. Boat alongside, gangway out. Double up fore-and-aft. We are home after three months and a voyage of 4407 miles.

Imagine coming home from a successful summer voyage: that warm feeling of accomplishment, the looking back, the winding down and, inevitably, the parting of ways. Then, deservedly, the sitting down and stretching one’s legs in a comfy armchair. Right?

Well, think again. Bosun School is here.

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