Captain's Log

Archive for the 'Rendezvous 2017' Category

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Captain’s Log – Boston to Summerside

At about 1300 on the 22nd of June PICTON CASTLE stood out past the Boston Light, set to the t’gallants. After five busy days in the port of Boston we are sailing out to join the Tall Ships fleet for the start of Sail Training International’s race number 4 of the Rendezvous 2017 Tall Ships Regatta from Cape Ann, Massachusetts to the northeastern end of mainland Nova Scotia.

Warm summer weather had been on order while we were in Boston but as we motor sailed out with the light and building southerly into Massachusetts Bay the crew quickly felt the cold breeze off of the 65° F water and ran to put on some warmer clothes. 19 vessels gathered for the race start, which was set about 10 miles to the east of the storied fishing town of Gloucester. It is always quite a sight to see a fleet of ships this size sailing in close quarters, especially on occasions such as this with a moderate breeze that allows the ships to set much if not all of their sail and get a good turn of speed going as well.

In an only somewhat serendipitous nod to the latter half of the Age of Sail, amongst the fleet are the Barque EAGLE, ALEXANDER VON HUMBOLDT II, GUAYAS, EUROPA, the 4 Masted Barque UNION and of course PICTON CASTLE making seven out of the nineteen ships in the fleet cut quite a scene of square riggers standing offshore until the fading evening light. To cap off the evening a spectacular sunset over Cape Ann bid the fleet farewell from the USA on our way to Canada.

Winds went fairly light on the first night, we kept all but the flying jib and gaff topsail set. Most of the fleet dispersed during the night, a group of ships like this with very different sailing qualities don’t stay together for long. The next day the Gulf of Maine began to show its true colours and as the day went on the wind began to increase, the air got colder and the fog set in.

Of all the times I have been across the Gulf of Maine, I don’t think I have ever actually seen it, there is almost always fog here. By midday we were shortened down to the main t’gallant in a Force 6 breeze. In this sort of weather, charging through the fog, extra care must be taken with the navigation, extra lookouts posted and a close watch kept on the radar and AIS. We are passing just to the north of the George’s Bank, and there are many fishing vessels in the area, over the years more than one vessel has come to grief from not paying close enough attention around these waters. A sobering reminder that we must be on our game.

As the day wore on the seas began to build and by evening we were shortened down to topsails and the foresail. Even though the weather is cold and wet the gang is kept busy about the deck, we had a full third of the crew change over in Boston so there are many new hands to teach the way of the ship to, learning lines, bracing, sail handling evolutions, all of this must be done in order to sail the ship. As it is, the ship comes first and we must sacrifice some comfort for the good of the ship and all onboard.

Two days we spent with a fresh fair wind and almost zero visibility, until the morning of the 25th when off of Halifax the wind eased, hauled southwesterly and the fog lifted. We again set to the royals and as the black hull of the ship began to warm the off watches came up from below to enjoy the sun. After two days of staring into the fog it felt good to get back the fair weather routines of work in the rig and about the deck. The on watch getting tar into the rig, oiling blocks and renewing ratlines, a carpenter finishing up our new fruit lockers and the sailmaker roping our new outer jib. In the afternoon we had an all hands workshop to teach seizings, allowing more of the new crew to get their hands on some of the ship’s rigging work.

On the afternoon of June 26 we crossed the finish line for the race and wore ship to bring us into Chedabucto Bay, the head of the waterway that separates Nova Scotia from Cape Breton Island. As our pilot for the Canso Strait and lock wasn’t due to board until the next morning we stood on towards an anchorage just outside the town of Arichat on the south side of Cape Breton. As the sun got low in the sky over Nova Scotia, PICTON CASTLE took off across the bay. With a fresh breeze but no seas to slow her down in the calm water of the bay we were able to carry every stitch of canvas full and drawing, clicking off 6.5 to 7 kts. It’s in these conditions one can really feel the power of a sailing ship rig like this and the energy it takes to get a heavy ship like this moving under wind power alone.

As we neared our anchorage for the evening the wind began to die off and we squared away for Arichat Harbour. At about 2230, just after last light the ship very quietly glided up to the anchor, apart from the soft spoken commands and the light rattle of sheets as the hands got in all sail forward it felt almost as if the ship were suspended in space, quite a contrast to the afternoon’s sailing. As the main yards squared away and the ship brought into the light breeze the sound of the anchor chain thundered out and all remaining sail was taken in. Arichat is a familiar spot for PICTON CASTLE from years past and it’s always good after a fresh passage to be anchored in a peaceful little spot such as this.

As morning dawned clear and flat calm, the engineer fired up the trusty B&W Alpha main engine and we hove back anchor to pick up our pilot for the Canso Strait. While the Strait is a natural channel it wasn’t really navigable until a lock was put in near the town of Port Hawkesbury to keep the currents down to a minimum. It was a pretty morning running up the Strait and the crew kept busy shining up the ship and getting ready for our next port visit. Just after 1200 PICTON CASTLE cleared the lock and dropped off the pilot as we steamed into St George Bay, now on the Gulf of St Lawrence side of Novas Scotia. Not too long after a light breeze sprang up from the east and the crew, now getting more confident with handling the rig, quickly made all sail and the main engine was shut down.

That evening we wore ship around Cape George and shaped up for the Northumberland Strait to the south of Prince Edward Island. While the Northumberland is pretty wide it’s still a lot more confined than sailing in the open ocean and as a result, it takes a little more effort and attention for everybody onboard. While passing Pictou Island in the night the breeze came on to a southerly Force 5 and the watch on deck quickly got in the royals and upper staysails. But with the wind easing a bit toward morning and the current setting the ship to the north the next watch got all sail set again to keep the ship on course.

Having made good time up the Strait it was decided to anchor for another night before passing under the Confederation Bridge, which connects Prince Edward Island to the mainland at New Brunswick and entering the Port of Summerside. As PICTON CASTLE approached Cape Tormentine all hands were called to be the ship ready for sailing onto the anchor. Though the same manner as had been gone through the other night, there was more wind this time and the evolution had to happen more quickly. But as we approached the anchorage at Rock Reef under Cape Tormentine the wind quickly shifted, in a short scramble the ship was made ready to come about and tack back up to the spot most ideal for the ship to anchor. It’s not an easy task to marshal 46 people to complete a manoeuvre most have never even heard of before. But the mates and lead seaman did a good job and this ship got through stays quickly without a hitch. As the ship began to gain speed on the other tack it was soon time to bring her head to wind, down with the headsails, in fore upper and lower topsails, midships the spanker and hard down the helm, as the ship came up smartly into the wind hands aft squared the mainyards to put on the brakes and the starboard anchor was let go. After all remaining sail was taken in the crew swarmed up into the rig to get sail securely stowed for the night.

As is always the case, a ship like this is more about the journey than it is the destination. As exciting as it is to come into a new place it is always good to be able to have a night at anchor before going into port with the hustle of going alongside and the hectic excitement that can be at the start of a new tall ships festival. It’s important to have a moment, to be able to sit with the ship at rest without any outside distractions, to look up at the rig, ready to spring to life again at the call to loose sail, and say “we did that, we sailed this ship here” and as Irving Johnson said “with our own hands”. That’s the accomplishment, and that is the important part of this journey.

 

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Day’s Run – 3 July, 2017

By Ship’s Purser Allison

With 8 new trainees on board from Summerside the new crew are becoming familiar with the ways of the PICTON CASTLE. It can sometimes be a bit overwhelming when we first head out to sea but the excitement often prevails. There is so much to learn and remember but soon it becomes easier and other crew members are always available to help guide them through the learning curve. Today the new crew learned about the correct and safe way to use a harness and began their aloft training. It can be very exciting when going aloft the first few times but you are not alone nor are you required to if you are uncomfortable. Being aloft, however, is the best view around and when the command is announced, crew immediately snap to attention and begin their ascent. The view is particularly nice today as we travel up the coast of New Brunswick, past Gaspe towards the Miscou Banks towards the St. Lawrence. This is a short passage but some very good sailing!

Noon Position: 43°52′.4N 064°15′.1W

Day’s Run: 117.8NM

Voyage: 3847NM

Distance to Port: 203NM

Course + Speed: NE 4-8 knots

Wind: Force 3 WSW

Weather: Good, cloudy

Swell Height and Direction: <1 metre SW

 

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Day’s Run – 27 June, 2017

By Ship’s Purser: Allison Steele

Today we heaved up anchor at 0830 and headed to meet our pilot to take us through the Canso Strait. The Canso Strait is the waterway that divides mainland Nova Scotia and Cape Breton Island. The Canso Canal was created between 1951 and 1953 and connects Chedabucto Bay on the Atlantic Ocean to St. George’s Bay on the Northumberland Strait, a sub-basin of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. It is 27km long and is around 3km wide and can accommodate any vessel that can travel along the St. Lawrence Seaway. There is a lock system that protects the waterway from the tidal difference between the two bodies of water which can reach up to a meter difference. As we make our way closer to Summerside, the weather has become warmer now that shore is in sight the dark green of land makes a nice contrast to the blue of the water. Days are quiet but busy as we prepare for our next Port and the crew puts their new skills into action with working aloft, rigging and rope projects. Rope mats, in particular, seem to be appearing throughout the day as it is a seemingly simple three step skill but in fact, takes quite a bit of time and attention. Once you start though it’s difficult to put it down until it is complete as there is a certain satisfaction to every task we complete. Not only are rope mats decorative, they also help to protect the deck from blocks that rest on top of it. There is always something new and interesting to learn and the crew is eager to get as much as they can from their time on board.

Fiji the Cat, looking after the rope

 

Noon Position: 43°44′.3N 061°39′.6W

Day’s Run: 83.9NM

Passage: 519.7NM

Voyage: 3576NM

Distance to Port: 142.3NM

Course and Speed: NW 3.5 knots

Wind: Force 1, variable

Weather: Good

 

 

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Day’s Run – 25 June, 2017

By: Purser Allison

Sunday Funday! Sunday at sea means a lighter work day for the crew. Although we are still a 24/7 ship and things still need to be cleaned, meals prepared and of course sailing, the crew will often work on their own projects or those of the ship. There was a splicing and whipping workshop for new crew that was also a chance for others to practice. Splicing is the process of weaving a rope back onto itself or to join to another rope. Sometimes it is to attach to another rope to extend the length and other times it is to create an eye. Whippings are to finish an end or secure the ends of a line to keep it from unravelling. Both are used daily on a ship and are important skills to know so it is good to have time to learn and practice. A few of the crew also made rope mats. It is a three step process that is repeated continually and seems simple enough but if you lose track of where you are in the process you have to start over again! Rope mats are both decorative and serve a purpose as they help to protect the deck in places where a block might rest.

Sunday is also the day off for our cook, Donald Church the Magnificent, so a few lucky chosen crew get to experience what it is like to cook for 46 people! It helps us all to appreciate the hard work that goes into keeping a crew fed, full, strong and ready for work!

Donald Church – Cook’s Day Off!

Noon Position: 44°17′.7N 063°14′.4W

Day’s Run: 141.4NM

Passage: 329.6NM

Voyage: 3386NM

Distance to Port: 324.5NM

Course and Speed: ENE 5.9KTs

Wind: W Force 3-4

Weather: Good

Swell Height and Direction: 1-2 feet W

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Day’s Run – 16 June, 2017

By Purser Allison

While anchored at Nahant just outside of Boston, the crew enjoyed a bright sunshiny morning and spiffed up the ship. She is glistening with new paint and varnish and looks beautiful and ready to receive visitors. As the Boston Tall Ship Festival will be a well attended and significant event, the crew was instructed on safety and security. Later in the afternoon, Captain Sikkema gave an informative lecture to a very attentive crew on the different types of rigs on ships, the changes and the role they played throughout history.  The Age of Sail is a fascinating time in history as is understanding the roots of tall ship sailing today.

Noon Position: 42°24.524’N 070°52.207W

Day’s Run: At anchor

Wind: SSE F1

Weather: Good changing to overcast and rainy

Swell height and direction: <1m SExS

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Day’s Run – 15 June 2017

By Allison Steele, purser

Today the crew was busy spiffing the ship up for our visit to Boston. With reggae music in the background, the crew painted, sanded and varnished, repaired ratlines and conducted our monthly inspection of all our safety equipment. Regular inspection not only ensures that it is in good working order but also helps to familiarize the crew with the equipment again. Preparation and prevention are the keys to safety and although emergencies are rare, it is good to know that everyone has a specific tasks and knows where things are and how they work. The crew enjoyed “family dinner” on the hatch this evening followed by a screening of the Irving Johnson film “Around Cape Horn” in the salon. Although the air is cool, the sun is warm and promises to be another glorious sunset.

Noon Position: 42°24.522’N 070°52.108W
Day’s Run: At anchor
Wind: S Force 5
Weather: Good
Swell height and direction: 2m SSE

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Day’s Run – 14 June 2017

By Allison Steele, purser

Today as we made our way closer to Boston we were joined again by some curious marine life. The crew was busy with ship’s work including painting, varnishing and tarring. We also conducted some drills in tacking and wearing the ship to make sure we are snappy for the Parade of Sail on Saturday! After dropping anchor outside of Boston Harbor, we had a stunning sunset and the decks were crowded with everyone snapping pictures including Sail Training International’s official photographer Valery Vasilevskiy who has been with us during this passage. Watch for some of his beautiful photography on our website and Facebook page.

Noon Position: 42°27.4’N 070°38.2W
Day’s Run: 40.2nm
Passage: 724.5nm
Distance Remaining: 10.5 nm
Wind: NE Force 3
Weather: Good
Swell height and direction:


photo by Valery Vasilevskiy

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Captain’s Log – Fish On!!

 

Fish On!!!

The best words shouted while at sea! On our sail to Bermuda or on any other passage, we like to drag a few lines in hopes of catching the elusive Mahi Mahi or any great fish we can lure aboard. Personally, my favourite rig is a 10-12′ bungee cord with 150lb test monofilament and the appropriate brightly coloured lure. With two lines out and two fish on we had no less than five Mahi Mahi (Dorado) on the stern. We got our fish in quickly and tossed the lines back out but were unable to lure the others aboard.

We thanked our catch and sent them off to the Ship’s Cook to be prepared for dinner for a very grateful crew.

 

 

Written by Trainee Heather Ritchie

Heather Ritchie

 

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Day’s Run – 13 June, 2017

By: Purser Allison

A beautiful day turning much warmer in the afternoon, the crew was joined by many curious marine animals. We saw no small amount of sharks, bottlenose dolphins. The crew also had full man overboard drill complete with a launching the rescue boat to retrieve our MOB practice buoy Lenny. Preparing and launching the boat quickly and safely takes practice and we seem to have it down pat with a time of two minutes from alarm to launching and two minutes to retrieval. Every second counts in the cold waters of the North Atlantic and the crew came together and successfully rescued our buoy… Lenny was relieved to be back on board.

Noon Position:  42°09.3’N 069°55.4W

Day’s Run: 118nm

Passage: 661.5nm

Course and speed: N1\2E

Wind: WNW Force 3

Weather: Good

Swell height and direction: <1m SSW

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Day’s Run – 12 June, 2017

By Purser Allison

We are approaching the Boston Harbour Shipping Lanes and have seen quite a bit of activity not just with vessels but with marine life. We were fortunate to see whales today that were quite curious about our comparatively small ship that they came to visit.

Captain Sikkema held workshops on ratline splices, ratlines and additional splicing. It’s much cooler today as we get further into North Atlantic waters and the crew had to dig for sweaters and blankets. The sun, however, is shining brightly and we no longer stand in the shadows to protect us from the heat but search out the sun for its warmth. Especially ship’s cat Fiji.

Noon position: 40°30.30N  068°36.6W

Day’s Run: 111nm

Passage: 540.5 NM

Distance Run: 159.5nm

Course and speed: NWx1\2N 4kts

Wind: WSW Force 4

Weather: fair

Swell height and direction: <1m WSW

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