Captain's Log

Archive for the 'Miscellaneous' Category

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Christmas is on its way – Need a last minute gift idea?

If you’ve been with us a while, you know we don’t often send out cheesy requests that you purchase our merchandise. It’s always available, but we usually sell it on the ship. Christmas is nearly here, though, and we have some of our super popular “We May Be Slow” shirts available. At only $25CAD each including tax and shipping (within USA & Canada), these shirts are a steal!

We have a variety of colours and sizes available this year:

Youth XL – Apple Green & Indigo Blue

Adult Small – Sky Blue, White & Apple Green

Adult Medium – Light Brown

Adult Large – Sky Blue & Light Brown

Adult XL – Teal, Light Brown, Sky Blue, Orange/Red & Apple Green (please note: since original posting, teal has sold out!)

Adult 2XL – Grey, Khaki Green, Royal Blue & Black

Please refer to the photos below to get an idea of the colours

If you would like to make an order, please send Trudi an email and she’ll get one out lickety split. Keep in mind there are less than four weeks until Christmas, so if the shirt is to go under the tree you’ll need to order asap!

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Now Hiring Mates

Picton Castle is now accepting applications for Mates/Watch Officers for the upcoming voyage. The voyage begins early 2018 and runs until May 2019. This is a sail training voyage for adults and will consist of significant blue-water passages.

Qualification requirements vary by position, but all professional crew must have STCW Basic Safety Training and extensive experience working on traditional sailing vessels. Mates must have, at a minimum, a 500 ton oceans mate certificate.

Please apply by sending an email with your CV and cover letter to info@picton-castle.com.

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Who Would You Want To Sail With?

Each Picton Castle voyage has its own character, its own inside jokes, its own on-board culture. One of the exciting parts of planning a voyage is putting together the crew and trying to imagine how everyone will interact together.

While there are different individuals on each voyage, there are some common themes. People who sail in Picton Castle are pretty adventurous. Some have had other big adventures in their lives, for some sailing on Picton Castle will be their first big adventure. All have a strong desire to be a part of the crew, doing their part to get the ship from port to port.

Picton Castle crew come from all over the world. We like having an international crew. We tend to have a number of Americans and Canadians, but also quite a few Europeans and people from a variety of other countries. Most people are on the younger side, but there are always those in their 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s and sometimes 70s. Our trainees come from a variety of backgrounds and have done all sorts of interesting things in their lives before sailing on Picton Castle. Some are recent graduates, some are taking a break from jobs, some are retired.

When we select our trainees, the most important question we consider is what each person will be like as a shipmate. The crew live, work, play and eat together in a fairly small space that, when at sea, they can’t leave. Imagine the kind of person you would like to share the experience with and you’ll start to paint a picture of what it means to be a good shipmate. Someone who is considerate, respectful, and friendly, with a good sense of humour, who is willing to do their share and then some.

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Erin Greig First Bermudian Woman to be Navigator

Former Picton Castle crew member, Erin Greig, was featured in The Royal Gazette in Bermuda yesterday.  Erin is the first woman in Bermuda to gain the Junior Navigator’s Certificate from Warsash Marine Academy in England and become an Officer of the Watch.  Her sea time on a number of sail training ships, including Picton Castle, helped to get her there!

Congtatulations, Erin!

The full article is available here.

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Doing Laundry At Sea

People ask all sorts of questions when they’re considering signing on board Picton Castle as a trainee. One we’ve been hearing a lot lately is about laundry. How do trainees wash their clothes on the voyage?

There is no washing machine on board, so any laundry you do on the ship needs to be done by hand. Because we do our best to conserve fresh water, the washing and rinsing is done in salt water, with a final rinse in fresh water.

Salt water soap is on the packing list, laundry is primarily what you’ll use it for. You can buy salt water soap at camping and outdoors stores. Alternately, we’ve found that many kinds of lemon dishwashing liquids also foam up in salt water and can be used for laundry.

Captain Moreland says the best way is to put your laundry in a bucket of salt water and soap and let it sit overnight. The next day, give it a light scrub, then rinse in salt water. Your final rinse can be in fresh water, to get the salt out.

To dry your laundry, we have laundry lines hanging over the well deck. Depending on wind conditions, you may need a number of clothespins to make sure your favourite t-shirt doesn’t blow overboard as it dries! We generally clear the laundry lines every evening before it gets dark so they’re empty overnight.

Alternately, many of the ports we visit have laundry services ashore, so some people on board will take their laundry ashore and drop it off on their day off duty, then pick up their nice clean, dry, folded clothes before returning to the ship.

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What is Ecotourism?

A very long time before Ecotourism was cool – before it was even a word – Picton Castle was an active ecotourism operator. But what does that mean?

Ecotourism is a word that seems to be popping up all over. The latest trend in travel, it is rising in popularity on an international level as we humans are finding it increasingly difficult to ignore the damage we have done and continue to do to this beautiful planet, and start trying to devise ways to lessen our footprint.

But what exactly is Ecotourism? People tell me it all relates to sustainable travel. Okay – but sustaining what: The environment? Animals? Cultures? The International Ecotourism Society defines Ecotourism as “responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment, sustains the well-being of the local people, and involves interpretation and education” (TIES, 2015). And for to be clear: “Education is meant to be inclusive of both staff and guests.”

So Ecotourism is about travelling responsibly. It’s about having a minimum impact on the planet, while visiting and learning about destinations around the world. This means being educated regarding local cultures however unusual they might seem to the traveller; it means doing your utmost to not inflict any sort of damage to the local flora and fauna; it means helping out where there is a need, without any of the associated harm that can sometimes come from uneducated or misguided assistance.

Whenever possible, Picton Castle travels under sail and not engine; we have a water maker system on board the converts salt water to fresh; we bring aid to countries in need including delivering supplies and school books to remote islands; we know the remote islands and motus we visit quite well and have workshops dedicated to each stop as we head there, so that when we arrive each trainee is well-informed of any unique customs or traditions, and as well as any actions which might cause unintended offence; we barter and trade on these islands so that the local economy is getting a boost from our visit that is fair to all involved without any negative impact.

So what is Ecotourism? Well, when you boil it down to its simplest form I’d say Ecotourism is a fancy word for respect. Respect for the planet, for animals and plants that live on her, and for each other. And yes, it’s a very good thing.

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Post Hurricane Relief in the Eastern Caribbean

Picton Castle has spent a lot of time sailing the Caribbean in the past 20 years. We tend to stick to the Windward and Leeward Isles of the Eastern Caribbean and have visited our favourite islands many times. The trade winds are sweet, anchorages are mostly quite good, the islands are beautiful and the people are warm, friendly and welcoming.

The recent hurricanes in the Caribbean have hit our friends hard. We’ve either been in touch or are waiting to hear news from friends in Anguilla, Antigua, Dominica, St. Maarten, and the British Virgin Islands. Many have had homes and businesses destroyed, but thankfully those we’ve heard from and their loved ones are still alive, uninjured and ready to rebuild.

We want to help rebuild. Over the past few weeks, as we’ve seen photos and videos of the devastation, we have been talking about how to help. Picton Castle has a big cargo hold and additional room in the main salon and on deck to carry more than a hundred tons. We could carry a load of supplies. We would want to go to an island we know, to help people we know, in a place where the need is greatest and other help is not on its way.

Although a port visit in the Caribbean is not scheduled for the first leg of the upcoming world circumnavigation voyage starting in March 2018, we have been talking about adding a stop to the itinerary in order to bring supplies. We would have to know where we would go and what they need most there, then either raise funds or goods on our own or partner with another organization to get the supplies to bring with us.

We have been asked whether we would go now, immediately, to carry a load of supplies. We think we could find professional crew who would volunteer their time for a mission like this, and there is the possibility that we could organize a drive locally for supplies. However, it still costs money to operate the ship and unless those costs are covered, we aren’t able to do it. Even with donated time and supplies for the islands, the ship’s costs of fuel, insurance, food and materials to maintain the ship are very real costs that Picton Castle simply can’t absorb.

Rebuilding after these hurricanes, after everything has been flattened, is going to be a long process. Building supplies and other items will still be required months and years down the road. As we figure out how and when best to assist, we’ll keep you posted. In the meanwhile, any comments, suggestions and input you have are welcome.

For what it’s worth, our hearts and minds are with those who have been affected by these hurricanes. Hopefully we’ll be able to provide some on-the-ground help within the next year.


Picton Castle at anchor stern-to in Dominica

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Reasons NOT to sail around the world in the Picton Castle….

I’m fairly certain I’ve heard every reason in the book to NOT sail away on a tall ship. Not only heard them, but stated them myself. That’s my deep, dark secret – my own personal shame: Even though I work for this ship on shore I’ve never sailed a tall ship. Despite never having sailed in one, I’m drawn to them and am insanely jealous of everyone signing up for this world voyage coming up soon. I want to go too. I wish I could go back in time and sail when I was younger and more adventuresome and minus the three kids who seem to think that as their mother I should be looking after them – that’s my list of reasons not to go right there.

One thing I have come to learn is that all the reasons not to sail aren’t reasons at all: they’re just excuses. Little roadblocks that I (and other people like me) put up to make the choice not-to-go an easier choice to make.

I’m too old: Rubbish. I’m not too old. At 46 I’m about mid-way through the age range of people coming to sail. We have people in their 70s coming along on the World Voyage.

 I’ve got too many people relying on me: Right. Because I’m so great at life, the entire Town of Lunenburg can’t bear to have me go away for a few months. I might be good, but I’m not that good. Nobody is.

It’s expensive: Yeah, okay. That’s real. It costs a pretty penny. But it’s basically the same price as many other major adventures you can experience, and a lot less than others. Price out a two-month trip to the top of Everest. You can sail around the world in Picton Castle twice for that ticket. And if you’re talking value for money, it won’t get much better. Cost is real, but if you can scrape it together, it’s just another excuse.

Rough weather: The one reason I was sure was a valid reason not to sail was extreme weather. It’s pretty simple: I don’t want to be in a ship in the middle of the ocean during a hurricane. Who in their right mind would?

I’ve always been in awe of the ships that sail across vast oceans – not just the ships but their crew as well. It seemed to me that to sail out into the endless ocean on a relatively tiny ship and be tossed about at the whim of King Neptune and Mother Nature was .. well crazy, but also brave beyond words. Braver than I could ever hope to be. For me the idea was as intoxicating as it was scary. Going to sea was a ‘when’ something goes wrong and not an ‘if’ something goes wrong. Seems like a valid reason not to sail to me.

As we roll through the month of September, the Atlantic Ocean appears to be doing a stellar job of demonstrating why a person should not ever go to sea at all. Ever. I can’t imagine there is a single person reading this that hasn’t heard about the crazy and terrifying string of hurricanes pummeling the Caribbean. Until I came to work here in this office, weather seemed a very random and scary thing. What I never seemed to notice was this: there aren’t any big ships (cruise ships, tall ships, cargo or otherwise) near those hurricanes. It’s because as wild and random as the weather seemed to me to be as a layman, it actually follows fairly reliable worldwide patterns that take us through the 12 months of the year. Captain Moreland – in fact, any experienced mariner who knows what he’s doing – can readily tell you where you DON’T want to be at fairly specific times of the year, and voyages are planned accordingly. For instance, you don’t want to be in the mid-Western Atlantic right about now during what is called ‘hurricane season’. This is between June and December with June and November not really counting much. Why? Well, hurricanes need certain things to be created: very warm water, warm air, earth’s rotation, appropriate ocean currents and lots of open space. Right now – August, September and into October – all things align to make the formation of hurricanes far more likely in the mid-Atlantic, the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico, and the currents are going to pull those storms westerly across the Atlantic toward the Caribbean and the Americas.  And it’s the same every year. There aren’t devastating hurricanes every year, but every year at the same time (right now) it becomes far more likely that they’ll form. So smart ships avoid those areas this time of year. Sailing around the world and avoiding catastrophic weather isn’t actually magic at all. Or luck. It’s logic. And the World Voyage is following a very logical and well-timed route – to take in all of the incredible and amazing ports Captain Moreland has fallen in love with over his many years at the helm, and to avoid all of the reliably severe weather patterns.  One world voyage the ship did not even have one gale.

So cross that off your list of reasons NOT to sail. It’s not a reason, it’s just another excuse that is stopping you from taking part in what will be the most amazing adventure of your life.

 

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Captain’s Log – The Bay of Fundy

By Purser Allison Steele

Our final ports of the Rendezvous 2017 voyage are within the Bay of Fundy on Canada’s East Coast. The Bay of Fundy is historically and ecologically significant as it contains the largest tide in the world; a whopping 29-foot change! For mariners, it can be challenging but not enough to keep the PICTON CASTLE from visiting Digby, Nova Scotia and Saint John, New Brunswick.

Picton Castle & Bluenose II Sailing to Digby

The Tall Ship Festival in Digby was also during the annual Crab Fest which brought scores of visitors and entertainment to the small fishing town and made for lively evenings. The local townspeople rolled out the red carpet for the Tall Ships and we were all treated to Digby scallops which this area is famous for. The Town of Digby itself was a very gracious host with events and amenities for all who were in town for the day. It was not uncommon to see costumed pirates, lobsters and the occasional fish wandering down the street delighting children and even a few adults. Despite the significant tides, visitors came out in throngs to tour the ships or just have a look, and the crew is always happy to talk about the ship we have called home all summer.

Crazy Digby Tides

The wharf where we were all alongside was situated in a way that allowed the crews of the ships to gather in the evening to share stories, a barbecue and music. It has been a wonderful but busy summer and it was nice to spend an evening socializing with other Tall Ship crew that we have been sailing with all summer.  A few of the crew were able to spend an afternoon with former World Voyage Four crew member Amanda and her family from Mariner Cruises out of Brier Island to go whale watching. Although the fog started to roll in, that didn’t deter the mighty humpbacks from putting on a performance including a mom and her calf just learning how to entertain the eager guests. Humpback whales are a most magnificent species and it was humbling to be alongside these gentle giants as they fed.

It was a wonderful visit to Digby and in usual east coast fashion, the townspeople were kind and generous but it was time to set sail for our next port, Saint John, New Brunswick.

Getting underway from Digby, the ships proceeded to the Annapolis Royal basin where the town of Annapolis Royal gathered to watch a sail past. It was an incredible sight as there had been significant fog for most of the day but it suddenly seemed to clear a path for the ships. I can only imagine what it looked like from shore, standing in a quaint seaside town that had been home to some of North America’s earliest European settlers and watching huge ships emerge from the fog.

Our final port for Rendevous 2017 Tall Ship Festival was also in the Bay of Fundy and full of beautiful architecture, an abundance of natural resources and, of course, great seafood! Saint John, New Brunswick held an impressive festival for the Tall Ships and their visitors. Despite the wide range in tides and some after effects of Hurricane Gert, the sturdy East Coasters did not shy away. Spectators and visitors came in droves and patiently waited their turn to tour the tall ships, and take in the attractions and vendors.

Allison with the Pirates

Saint John often has cruise ships visit their town but eleven Tall Ships is an entirely different story. The festival was a treat for the senses with food trucks, live music and the Pirates of Halifax wandering the streets entertaining everyone in attendance.

Many of us left our final official port of the summer with mixed feelings.  There is a certain excitement for some of us who will be returning to our ‘land lives’, some staying in Lunenburg to attend Bosun School in the fall and more than a few dreaming of the next and final World Voyage beginning in March 2018. Regardless of our individual paths, there is a sense of sadness in the ship as we come to the end of the summer. It has been a remarkable 4 months with 13 ports, over 6000nm and countless new friends that become part of our “ship family”.  The world is much smaller than it seems for sailors, and often shipmates cross paths throughout their lifetimes in various ships, ports, seas and continents. One thing I have learned over the years and my involvement with PICTON CASTLE is that you never say ‘good bye’… it is always ‘until next time’.

Final Farewell

 

 

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Captain’s Log – Fish On!!

 

Fish On!!!

The best words shouted while at sea! On our sail to Bermuda or on any other passage, we like to drag a few lines in hopes of catching the elusive Mahi Mahi or any great fish we can lure aboard. Personally, my favourite rig is a 10-12′ bungee cord with 150lb test monofilament and the appropriate brightly coloured lure. With two lines out and two fish on we had no less than five Mahi Mahi (Dorado) on the stern. We got our fish in quickly and tossed the lines back out but were unable to lure the others aboard.

We thanked our catch and sent them off to the Ship’s Cook to be prepared for dinner for a very grateful crew.

 

 

Written by Trainee Heather Ritchie

Heather Ritchie

 

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