Captain's Log

Archive for the 'Lunenburg' Category

| More

Setting Sail From Lunenburg

It has been a while since we updated the Captain’s Log – we’ve been so busy getting Picton Castle ready to set sail from Lunenburg that we have been ignoring our blogging duties. We’ll bring you up to date on all the activities of the crew here at our home base in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, Canada in the next few days.

However, we don’t want to wait to tell you about Picton Castle‘s planned departure from Lunenburg. The ship will get off the wharf at about 4:00pm on Thursday February 15, 2018 and head out to anchor in Lunenburg Harbour, then will get underway from the anchorage the following day once the final details are in order, bound for Bermuda.

All are welcome to join us on our wharf at 174 Bluenose Drive, Lunenburg, just before 4:00pm on February 15th to wish the ship and crew well on her upcoming voyage. Picton Castle is scheduled to return to Lunenburg in May 2019, so this will be the last chance to see her in Lunenburg for almost a year and a half.

| More

Getting Ready for Sea

GETTING READY FOR SEA
By: Captain D. Moreland

A pretty deep, snowy and proper winter here in Lunenburg these days. The PICTON CASTLE is snugly moored to her wharf; 1,500 pound anchor and 300 feet of big anchor chain out in the harbour holding her against SE gales and storms to which this harbour is exposed, many big lines on to the dock. She has not budged an inch nor parted a hawser in even the strongest gales. And we had a whopper of a hurricane force storm recently. We had a long, long summery autumn and then it seemed like it skipped autumn altogether and went straight to full tilt winter. Well, we are halfway between the equator and the north pole here in Nova Scotia…no palm trees ringing the bay here.

Lunenburg is certainly a year-round port and we are getting ready to head off to sea soon. A few days south from here a ship will have crossed the Gulf Stream and the crew will find themselves peeling off the sweaters and quilted gear and pulling on shorts and t-shirts. It is a pretty astonishing transformation. Of course, a mariner has to be pretty mindful of getting a decent weather window to sail from here safely but that is true any time of year. Our plan is to sail from Lunenburg here in February and make our way to St Georges Bermuda and get our anchor down there. This time of year, Bermuda is quite a bit better place to get some painting done on the ship and any number of other things to make her look nice over a couple week period. The gang is keen on this too.

Now we are getting the PICTON CASTLE ready for sea again. Of course, when she sailed in to Lunenburg last fall she was ready for sea, wasn’t she? Logic dictates as much. So, what would we be doing? We are attending to a range of items on our list to both care for the ship and get ready for sea. Right now we have the faithful 24’ monomoy long boat hauled up at the Dory Shop for an overhaul. This venerable and able craft is getting well scraped, sanded, primed and painted as well as some minor carpentry here and there, a new rub-rail and stern sheets (a seat in the stern). This work is difficult to do aboard when sailing as we use the boat so much. But now is a good chance what with the good wood stove going and plenty hands hard at it.

What else? Down in the nice warm engine room we are looking after a few things. Floor plates are getting re-bolted down, water maker gauges being replaced, starting air bottles getting fine tuned, engine mounts for our single cylinder SABB getting replaced, a nice cleaning job done in the engine-room as well as adjacent ER supply room getting nicely stowed and cleaned up. Galley supply inventories as well as medical kit inventories are getting done. We have welders coming in to look after a few small projects on deck. Lots of buying is in order: paint, rope, food, lumber, canvas, all sorts of stuff for both the next few months as well as an entire world voyage ahead to consider. Now, we can get much that we need along the way – we are sailing AROUND the world, not away from the world – but some things are pretty hard to find and we need to have with us when we sail. And we need to make sure all our navigation gear, communications gear, safety gear is all in good order. We need to revue all charts and publications. All auxiliary equipment like welders, emergency pumps, emergency satellite comms, damage control supplies need to be aboard and in good order.

So, while it is cold outside and plenty snow, things are heating up on the good ol’ Barque PICTON CASTLE.

 

| More

Winter Weather Woes

12 January, 2017

It is an incredibly mild day here in Lunenburg today. It’s actually  +12°c/54°f which is incredibly warm for us on a mid-January day in Nova Scotia. The harbour is almost perfectly calm; this morning as I was walking down Bluenose Drive is was a sheet of glass. Just perfect. You would never guess this is the same place that was mid-storm only one week ago.

We had an outrageous winter storm in Nova Scotia last week – as did much of the Eastern Provinces of Canada, and Eastern States of the USA.  Truth be told, we fared far, far better than many other places. Even other places within Nova Scotia. This was partially due to good luck; partially to good management.

Late on Wednesday afternoon the Captain and Liam went down to the ship and, along with the few crew who remained on the ship over the Christmas holidays, they doubled up on the hawsers and lashed various rigging and things on the ship and the wharf. There were ropes everywhere: the storm was going to be a bad one, we had plenty of warnings about it. Winds up to 140k/hr. That’s massive. They were predicting snow, freezing rain, rain and a huge storm surge. We were worried.

When things started getting bad, Captain Moreland had the crew come set up sleeping bags at his house in his living room, and taking turns they made hourly treks down to the ship to check on things. It was a long, cold, windy, wet & powerless night.  The rum seasoning barge that sits out in Lunenburg Harbour, ageing Ironworks’ next batch of extremely good rum, lost its anchors and ended up on the rocky beach next to Picton Castle. There are so many vastly worse places it could have ended up, but it wedged itself onto our beach and stayed there throughout the storm.

The storm raged all Thursday and through Thursday night, but when all was said and done, and the sun came up on Friday, we fared pretty well. There is an old trawler tied up opposite Picton Castle called Primo. The easterly winds pushed against Primo throughout the storm – pushing her away from the wharf in a way wharves are not used to. The winds were strong; so were the hawsers we set up. Something had to give way, and eventually, it was actually the wood of the wharf that gave way. The ship and hawsers were all fine; the wharf needs a bit of t.l.c.

The next few days we had temperatures of -12°c/10°f with a windchill of minus too cold to even think about. Everything iced up and we were in a deep chill. From unusually cold all the way up to unusually warm for this time of year. Something is going on with Mother Nature.

| More

Bosun School – The Wrap Up

Our 8th Bosun School has come to a close, and we had a lovely graduation ceremony at Lunenburg’s historic
Dory Shop on Friday 18 December.

Closing ceremonies are an important part of the Bosun School. Each of the participants works so hard –
it isn’t easy, this school of ours. It takes a lot of hard work and dedication to get through it, and that is
one of the reasons we only offer it to individuals who already have some amount of sea experience under
their belt; people who already know they want to work at sea.  So much hard work deserves
acknowledgement, and the closing ceremony is designed to provide that.

In the final weeks of the school, Captain Moreland met individually with each of the participants to talk
about what they see in their future. He was able to provide them with advice, suggestions, and
recommendations, sometimes helping them with their plan and sometimes pointing them in another
direction. Some of the graduates are planning going on to take additional courses from other institutions;
some are going on to work on otherships; all were offered the opportunity to crew the ship as Picton Castle
heads to Bermuda in February.  Almost all accepted the offer. Because as important as it is to have the   the time to dedicate to learning these skills on land, there is no better place to practice these new skills
than at sea. Captain Sikkema is heading south with a very capable crew indeed!

The graduation at the Dory Shop was a great night. It started with some music by Bosun School students
Cici, Anders & Lars, along with a few drinks and snacks, then a sit-down meal of hot fish chowder prepared
by Niko, who was the Bosun School cook.  After the meal there were a few speeches made by Lunenburg’s
Mayor Rachel Bailey, by Captain Moreland, and by the two class valedictorians: Ann Featherstone and Caleb
Winberry. No speech was too long; no speech was too short. Each student received a certificate and letter
from the Bosun School outlining what they have studied in the past three months.  They also each received
a certificate from the Province of Nova Scotia congratulating them on their completion of Bosun School –
our MLA Suzanne Lohnes-Croft wasn’t able to attend in person so her office arranged for the certificates
instead. The whole night was the ultimate mix of perfect. When the certificates were all presented, the tables
were cleared away and the Dory Shop’s Mike Gray had his band perform until the wee hours.

One of the many fun parts of working here in the Picton Castle office is being able to watch futures unfold before our trainees and Bosun School graduates when they leave us; I’m looking forward to seeing where this incredible group of individuals end up!

Bosun School 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

| More

Festive Weekend in Lunenburg

Lunenburg was alive with festive spirit this weekend and the Bosun School students took part in the celebrations.

On Friday evening, people gathered on the waterfront to see the lighting of the vessels. Vessels at the Fisheries Museum of the Atlantic and Adams & Knickle usually participate, along with Bluenose II, and this year we we have lights on Picton Castle as well. All of the vessels were lit up, as well as a Christmas tree made of lobster traps and a number of decorated Christmas trees (including one we decorated). The vessel lighting was followed by fireworks over the harbour. Local businesses and individuals contributed to fund the fireworks, including a donation from the Picton Castle Bosun School.

The highlight of Saturday was the Santa Claus Parade. The Bosun School students prepared the float and rode in it during the parade. Our float featured the brightly coloured dory Sea Never Dry, built at the Dory Shop in Lunenburg and part of Picton Castle‘s fleet of small boats and sailed all over the world. There were about 50 floats in the parade, which shows the great community spirit here.

For the Bosun School it’s back to classes and workshops this week, finishing some varnish practice and getting a lesson on making ratlines.


Shala decorates the Christmas tree on the waterfront


Bosun School/Picton Castle/Dory Shop float in the Santa Claus Parade

| More

Happy Thanksgiving!

One of the fun things about sailing with an international crew is celebrating holidays from different countries.  It’s the same in Bosun School, with students of a number of different nationalities.  We celebrated Canadian Thanksgiving back in October, and are celebrating American Thanksgiving today.

Niko is busy cooking up a big delicious dinner and we’ve put the usual projects aside for the day in order to focus on festive projects.  This upcoming weekend kicks off the holiday season in Lunenburg and we’re participating fully.  Today we are rigging up Christmas lights on Picton Castle’s masts, decorating a tree at the Fisheries Museum, and decorating our float for the Santa Claus parade.

On Friday evening, the vessels on Lunenburg’s waterfront will be lit up for the season.  The museum’s fleet along with the fishing fleet at Adams & Knickle usually participate, and we’ll be joining in the illumination as well.  The vessel lighting event begins at 6pm outdoors at the Fisheries Museum with warm foods and drinks from local restaurants, along with music and caroling.  At 6:30pm the vessels will be lit, along with the decorated trees at the museum, and at 7:30pm there will be fireworks over the harbour.

On Saturday, there are a number of markets and events happening throughout the town.  At 3pm it’s time for the Santa Claus parade.  Apparently there will be over 50 floats in the parade, including ours.  Keep an eye out for our brightly painted dory, Sea Never Dry!  We’ll take photos and post them for anyone who can’t join us in person.

So, the Bosun School is celebrating Thanksgiving by temporarily becoming a North Pole workshop, followed by a wonderful meal together.  We have a lot to be thankful for here.

| More

Why Train Under Sail?

From the mid 19th century until the mid 20th century, sailing ships were the incubator and hatchery for almost all deep-sea steam-ship mariners be they naval or merchant marine. This is what came to be known as “trained in sail” or later, “sail training”. This training service came about due to the extraordinarily rich seamanship acquisition environment that was the deep water sailing ship. In the rapid-fire extreme requirements encountered during WWII for instant mates, lieutenants, commanders and captains, “90 day wonders” they were called, this chain was broken on national scales – but though this chain of traditional training has been worn thin, the skills of a sailing ship seafarer remain critical to the safe and cost effective running and management of modern motor vessels. A well run sailing ship is, now more than ever, the best place to prepare for and begin one’s career at sea.

Sailing to sea in ships is an amazing way of life and can be richly rewarding in countless ways. Not the least of these ways is that mariners can make a good living from ships and the sea. Often well in excess of what they could make ashore. Additionally, every job taken by a citizen going to sea leaves a job open in their country of origin. And successful mariners tend to contribute directly to their home economies and do so disproportionately to the cost and length of time of their educations. There is a great international demand for the next generation of seafarers.

But make no mistake, the sea is an extremely demanding environment not particularly forgiving to the inept, untrained or ill equipped. Good seafarers have to be excellent at a broad range of critical skills. It takes years at sea, working hard, learning at every turn, before one can call oneself a seasoned pro. Recently among flag state marine regulatory agencies there has been a welcome insistence on having a basic and advanced safety and marine emergency training for professional mariners resulting in the United Nations International Maritime Organisation (IMO) mandated STCW (Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for seafarers) Basic Safety Training (BST) and certification. Training in firefighting, PFDs, first aid, immersion suits, life rafts etc. This is all to the good and is to be applauded. It is important basic familiarisation with what a mariner is to be able to do when things go all wrong aboard a ship at sea. This training and these skills, however, are quite a bit different from the broad seamanship skills and training a mariner needs to be both useful aboard a ship and to also seriously contribute to the reduction of the likelihood of things going all wrong. BST is established to have a basic standard of what to do when things go wrong. Broad and deep seamanship skills are what contributes mightily to preventing things from going wrong in the first place. BST is how to bandage a cut. Seamanship is not getting the cut. This is where the Picton Castle and the Bosun School come in.

In addition to adventurous sailing and traveling to amazing islands and ports all over the world, the voyages of the Cook Islands Barque Picton Castle are about learning, teaching and passing along the required skills of seafaring. And by direct extension, the essential skills required of any resourceful mariner sailing in todays cargo ships, passenger ships, tugboats, supply boats, fishing vessels, yachts, the Navy and marine related shore positions. These include marinas, maritime schools, museums, sail lofts, rigging lofts, boat yards, ship yards, dry docks and sundry others.

| More

Traveling to Join Picton Castle’s World Voyage

Picton Castle’s World Voyage itinerary is full of exotic place names, including some you may never have heard of before. We specialize in visiting exotic tropical ports, taking our ship and crew to some unique, remote places. But that doesn’t mean it’s difficult to make travel arrangements to join the ship for a leg of the voyage. We design the itinerary so that leg changeovers take place in ports with easy airport access and good flight connections.

Trainee crew members who sign on to sail on the world voyage and make the full voyage will join the ship and depart the ship in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, Canada. Those who sail for a leg of the voyage (or more than one leg) will join Picton Castle in one port and depart in another. Wonder where you would sign on and off each leg?

Leg 1 – join in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, Canada, sign off in Avatiu, Rarotonga, Cook Islands
March 18, 2018 to August 1, 2018

Leg 2 – join in Avatiu, Rarotonga, Cook Islands, sign off in Benoa, Bali, Indonesia
August 2, 2018 to October 29, 2018

Leg 3 – join in Benoa, Bali, Indonesia, sign off in Cape Town, South Africa
October 30, 2018 to January 28, 2019

Leg 4 – join in Cape Town, South Africa, sign off in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, Canada
January 29, 2019 to May 18, 2019

How do you get to these places?

Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, Canada

Lunenburg is located on Nova Scotia’s South Shore on the Atlantic coast of Canada, about an hour and a half drive from the Halifax Stanfield International Airport. Halifax Stanfield has multiple flights daily direct from most major North American cities as well as many major European cities. To get from the airport to the ship, there are a few local shuttle services including Kiwi Kaboodle and Cloud Nine Shuttle. Picton Castle docks on Lunenburg’s waterfront, on Bluenose Drive.

Avatiu, Rarotonga, Cook Islands

The Cook Islands is a country in the South Pacific made up of 15 islands spread out over almost two million square kilometres of ocean. Rarotonga is the largest and most populated island in the Cooks, while still small, safe and friendly, and is the one island with an international airport. Flights go daily to New Zealand with a few different airlines and weekly to Los Angeles with Air New Zealand. To get from the airport to the ship, you can get a taxi at the airport. If you prefer to book a shuttle in advance, you could check out Raro Tours or Tiare Transport. Picton Castle docks in the harbour at Avatiu.

Benoa, Bali, Indonesia

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The island of Bali’s major industry is tourism, so they’re all set up for visitors. The Bali Ngurah Rai International Airport has daily flights to a number of destinations, some within Indonesia and some to other Asian countries or to Australia or New Zealand. Getting from the airport to the ship is easy because there are so many taxis in Bali – just be sure to negotiate the price before you hop in. Picton Castle usually anchors in Benoa Harbour in Bali. We use our small boat to make runs between ship and shore every few hours, usually picking up from the Bali Marina (we will confirm this with anyone sailing on this leg closer to the ship’s arrival).

Cape Town, South Africa

Cape Town is the biggest city we sail to on the World Voyage, located in the Western Cape province of South Africa. The Cape Town International Airport is located just outside the city and has daily flights to major centres in Africa, Europe and Asia. On previous visits, our ship’s agent in Cape Town has made arrangements to pick up incoming trainee crew members, but if that’s not the case on this upcoming visit, taxis are readily available at the airport. Picton Castle docks at the Victoria & Alfred Waterfront in Cape Town.

Exact details on where to find Picton Castle in each of these ports will be communicated to trainees closer to the ship’s arrival, as well as any updates or additional tips on traveling from the airport to the ship. While arranging flights and ground transportation is the responsibility of each trainee individually, our shore crew are happy to help provide details and advice based on first-hand experience in all of these ports.

| More

Second Layout of a Mizzen Staysail

On Monday, the Bosun School students went to the Lunenburg Community Centre to use the gym floor to lay out a sail. Actually, this is the second layout for this sail – it had its first layout back in 2015 when Picton Castle was in Cape Town, South Africa.

As Picton Castle sails to various ports around the world, we often look for suitable places to lay out sails. The area must be flat and open, big enough to stretch out the full sail. We’ve used gyms and lofts, but we’ve also used cement and wooden docks, grassy fields, parking lots, and pretty much anywhere else that has big open space.

We’re not the only ones who have used the Lunenburg Community Centre for laying out sails. Michele Stevens Sailloft has used this space when they were working on sails for the schooner Bluenose II and for the schooner Columbia. In fact, the mainsails for these vessels are too big to fit in gym so they could only lay out half at a time.

In comparison, our mizzen staysail looked quite small, taking up less than a quarter of the gym floor. By the time it’s ready for the second layout, the canvas cloths have already been seamed together. The purpose of a second layout is to sketch out the sail’s shape and cut off any excess fabric. Measurements are carefully made before the cutting begins, using both knives and scissors.

Once the trimming of the sail is complete, the second layout is done. Next up is putting on the corner patches, then putting the tabling around the edges of the sail, then making and sewing in all of the grommets.


Anders, Tyler and Annie trim the edges of the sail

| More

Bosun School Launches and Rows A Dory

One of the main things we focus on at Bosun School is small boat handling. Students will practice handling boats of all kinds by rowing them, sailing them and driving them with motors. It’s one of the essential skills of a good mariner, being able to handle small boats. The best way to become proficient is to practice. A lot.

This past week, students at Picton Castle‘s Bosun School prepared and launched a Banks dory named Rocky. The boat was built at Lunenburg, Nova Scotia’s historic Dory Shop, which is celebrating 100 years in business in 2017. The students gave it a paint job and launched it from the beach at the Dory Shop.

Captain Moreland demonstrated how to row a dory. Students then had the chance to practice, followed by a more in-depth lesson.

Here are video clips of the launch and of Captain Moreland’s rowing demonstration.

© 2003–2018 Windward Isles Sailing Ship Company Ltd. | Partners | Site Map | Privacy Policy